Image shows bountiful rosemary in the gardens for rosemary herbal remedies.

Back To The Garden: Rosemary Herbal Remedies

 

There is a bountiful garden in our backyard.  We grew many types of vegetables and herbs. Yesterday, while picking some lettuce in the garden to prepare for the evening’s dinner, I noticed that there’s an abundance of rosemary that is ready for harvesting.

 

I researched Jethro Kloss’ Back to Eden (a classic book on herbs, natural diet, and holistic health and lifestyle) for information about rosemary.  Besides using the leaves to flavor food, I want to find out what other uses it has.  According to the book, rosemary is a remedy for colds, colic and nervous conditions.  It’s very good in headaches caused by nervousness.  It is helpful in some cases of mental disturbance.  It aids digestion, cough, consumption and strengthens the eyes.  There are other uses but I would like to keep the list short. : )

 

Among many uses, rosemary is also an excellent ingredient for shampoos and is reported to prevent premature baldness or hair loss by stimulating the hair follicles.  Then, I researched the web and discovered that the herb may also relieve dandruff and dry, itchy scalp.  It stimulates and improves circulation to the scalp thus encouraging hair growth.  Additionally, rosemary leaves your hair soft and shiny.

 

After several searches on the web, I prepared my own rosemary hair rinse at home:

 

  1. Place the sprigs of fresh rosemary in a saucepan.
  2. Fill up with enough water to cover the rosemary sprigs.
  3. Boil the water and allow to simmer gently for about 5 to 10 minutes.
  4. Strain the liquid. Remove the rosemary sprigs.
  5. Use. Shampoo (and condition) as normal. Finish with the rosemary rinse. Do not rinse out!

 

You can bottle this preparation if there is any left over.  The rinse will keep in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

 

You can also make rosemary infused oil by following these steps:

 

  1. Finely chop the fresh rosemary to bring out the aroma.
  2. Place the finely chopped rosemary leaves into a glass jar.
  3. Pour olive or jojoba oil on top of the herbs.
  4. Put the lid on. Shake a little. Store the jar in a warm, dark place for two weeks.
  5. Strain the oil after two weeks. Pour into a storage container or back into the glass jar.
  6. It is now ready to use as follows: Gently massage the rosemary infused oil into your scalp and hair for about 10 to 20 minutes. Leave it on for half an hour or more before shampooing. The rosemary treatment will help alleviate dandruff and scalp irritation, in addition to stimulate hair growth, as well as adding shine and luster.

 

If you do not have fresh rosemary, you can use rosemary essential oil:

 

  1. Purchase rosemary essential oil.
  2. Add a few drops of the essential oil to your choice of oil (such as olive or jojoba).
  3. Gently massage the rosemary infused oil into your scalp and hair for about 10 to 20 minutes. Leave it on for half an hour or more before shampooing.

 

Many decades ago, women turned to their gardens, woods and fields for plants that met all of their beauty needs naturally.  Nowadays, many beauty products contain chemicals that are toxic for our bodies and detrimental to our health.  More and more women and men are seeking natural alternatives and remedies as they realize the implications of allowing such chemicals and toxins into their bodies.  We are returning to the garden and back to nature.  We are taking our health and beauty into our own hands and relearn practices that are effective and beneficial to our bodies.

 

I would like to leave you with these words from Kloss’ book, Back to Eden:

 

“There is a wonderful science in nature, in trees, herbs, roots, and flowers, which man has never yet fathomed … If our scientists and medical colleges would put forth the same effort in finding the virtues in the “true remedies” as found in nature for the use of the human race, then poisonous drugs and chemicals would be eliminated and sickness would be rare indeed.”

 

Resources

 

  1. Kloss, Jethro. Back To Eden. Twin Lakes: Lotus Press, 2004. Digital.
  2. WikiHow
  3. Curly Nikki

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